Tattoo Philosophy Simplified

The Philosophical Functionality of the Tattoo: A Philosophy of ArtI’m just as bored as you are when That Girl explains to a group of adoring imbeciles why she has an enigmatic symbol tattooed on her shoulder—a result of too many tequila shots.

I get it.

Individual tattoo philosophy stories are not necessarily interesting, but tattoo creation narratives contribute to the general ontology of Art.

If tattoos are used as a form of artistic expression, why does someone choose skin for their creations rather than another material or medium?

Why is skin the most appropriate canvas for an idea?

Can a tattoo sometimes be art and sometimes just a marking?

How do you distinguish which is the case?

If That Girl is foolish for getting a tattoo while inebriated, does it follow that a person can never create artwork while intoxicated?

Is That Girl potentially an artist? Why, or why not?

Do tattoos evolve over time in ways that other potential art forms don’t?

Are tattoos misinterpreted more or less than other types of potential artwork?

When inspecting a tattoo, the viewer is potentially in the presence of the artist.

How does this relationship differ from other visual art forms?

What can one learn about art through a medium who can talk?

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The Philosophical Functionality of the Tattoo: A Philosophy of Art

Stefanie Flaxman
is the creator of @RevisionFairy and author of a new book about heartbreak.

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