Is There Actually a Way to Get Over Heartbreak?

Buy the Book - How to Overcome Heartbreak

Once your fairy tale ends and you’re forced to face a heartbreaking reality, you don’t want to hear more bullshit.

Unfortunately, traditional talk about getting over heartbreak is as aggravating and distracting as the situation that broke your heart.

How to Overcome Heartbreak Without Projectile Vomiting: A Guide for Cynical Hopeless Romantics is the only heartbreak book that doesn’t mention your Ex.

Aren’t you tired of lamenting about everything that’s wrong with him or her?

When relationships, dating, and love are the themes of get-over-heartbreak discussions, solutions focus on getting over the people who hurt you.

But heartbreak isn’t about them.

It’s about You.

How do you let heartbreak change your behavior?

[Read more…]

7 Lies About Getting Over Heartbreak

Getting Over Heartbreak. Photo Credit – Flickr: John KoetsierFriends and family have benevolent intentions when you turn to them for help as you’re getting over heartbreak.

But those people want to make you feel better, so they’re not going to tell you the truth.

The truth hurts.

Lies may comfort you and provide temporary relief as your spinning head tries to pick up the pieces of your broken heart.

They serve as makeshift hope that prevents you from completely shutting down.

Will they give you long-term satisfaction?

Here are seven soothing sentiments, but irrelevant lies your close companions will tell you about how to overcome heartbreak. [Read more…]

Artist Intent: The Role of a Medium Who Talks

Artist Intent. Photo Credit – Flickr: incurable_hippieIn the chapter, “Interpretation and Identification,” in The Transfiguration of the Commonplace, Arthur Danto considers two painting, J and K, that are “distinct, enormously different works, however visually indiscernible.”

The following example depicts a similar case to highlight Danto’s art philosophy argument.

The Creations of John and Kevin

John is in his fourth year of art school at the undergraduate level and still feels he has learned nothing about what makes a creation a work of art.

His drawings are drastically different from other students’ drawings in his classes, yet they are all treated as works of art during his class critiques. John’s drawings appear three-dimensional and resemble photographs, while many of his classmates do not approach art through realism, and instead produce, what John considers, very juvenile drawings. Nonetheless, these drawings are evaluated, put on display in school art shows, and considered art by everyone John comes in contact with, in the same fashion that his drawings are considered art.

One day, John gets fed up with producing art for a college that is going to consider anything he produces a work of art. He no longer wants to spend time using care and precision in his drawings to make them look like photographs. John decides that since his work will be treated as art regardless of what it looks like, he might as well not even physically produce the art himself.

To complete his work for the remainder of his time in art school, John designs a computer program that randomly generates “art.” The software produces colors and shapes that form a composition, and the only effort John puts into creating an artwork is pressing a “generate art” button. When John hears his classmates and professors try to analyze what the colors and shapes could represent in the first work that his software produces, he laughs to himself because he knows that no artistic intent went into the creation of the work. The composition took virtually no time to create and symbolizes nothing for John. [Read more…]

Philosophy of Art Versus Aesthetics

Philosophy of Art. Photo Credit – Flickr: dogwelderAre tattoos meaningless markings or a possible form of 
self-beautification or self-expression?

What purpose does it serve to discuss tattoos as possible works of art?

Immanuel Kant discusses tattoos as a possible form of self-beautification in The Critique of Judgment. He writes:

We could add much to a building that would immediately please the eye, if and only if it was not to be a church. We could adorn a figure with all kinds of spirals and light but regular lines, as the New Zealanders do with their tattooing, if only it were not the figure of a human being.

It is Kant’s position that the Maori, who tattoo their faces, do not produce anything beautiful with tattooing because they disrupt the human’s inherent form. The tattoo designs, themselves, might be beautiful but not if they are manifested on a human being. The beauty of a human being, for Kant, depends on the human’s natural form. Adding a tattoo to a human being is an inorganic act and therefore not beautiful, he concludes. [Read more…]

Tattoo Philosophy Simplified

The Philosophical Functionality of the Tattoo: A Philosophy of ArtI’m just as bored as you are when That Girl explains to a group of adoring imbeciles why she has an enigmatic symbol tattooed on her shoulder—a result of too many tequila shots.

I get it.

Individual tattoo philosophy stories are not necessarily interesting, but tattoo creation narratives contribute to the general ontology of Art.

If tattoos are used as a form of artistic expression, why does someone choose skin for their creations rather than another material or medium?

Why is skin the most appropriate canvas for an idea?

Can a tattoo sometimes be art and sometimes just a marking?

How do you distinguish which is the case?

If That Girl is foolish for getting a tattoo while inebriated, does it follow that a person can never create artwork while intoxicated?

Is That Girl potentially an artist? Why, or why not? [Read more…]

Can Anyone Write a Book About Heartbreak?

Book About HeartbreakApproach any person walking down the street, male or female, and he’ll have at least three stories to tell you from his book of love gone wrong.

The passive-aggressive grow bitter with these stories, the proactive overcompensate, the cunning seek revenge, and the obsessive philosophize about them.

We’re exploring the last category.

While everyone experiences heartbreak, each brokenhearted tale has a unique fingerprint that defines each individual.

You own your heartbreak in the game of romance, and it’s not a single-player configuration.

Heartbreak is commonly and understandably—but incorrectly—interpreted as a personal attack; we feel hurt, and don’t see anything beyond the pain. It’s all about what’s being done to us.

A heartbreaker breaks the heart of the heartbreakee.

Except it’s not that precise.

The heartbreaker has a better perspective of the heartbreak than the heartbreakee.

Those who break our hearts can often see ourselves more clearly than we can. While our minds are clouded with idealism and fantasy, they see reality. And they see that we are meant for something else. [Read more…]